Texas congressman doubles down when Capitol Police deny they 'illegally investigated' his office

He hypothesized that he may have been "maliciously" investigated because he has "been a vocal critic" of Pelosi and capitol authorities after Jan. 6, 2021.
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Capitol Police car.
Capitol Police car at U.S. Capitol April 28, 2021.
(Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

Representative Troy Nehls (R-Texas) on Tuesday defended his accusation that the U.S. Capitol Police illegally investigated his office after the agency dismissed any claims of wrongdoing.

Nehls said that on Nov. 20, 2021, "Capitol Police entered my office without my knowledge and photographed confidential legislative products." Nehls claimed that two days later while the House was in recess, "three intelligence officers" dressed as construction workers attempted to enter his office again. They then allegedly encountered a staff member and began questioning him about the illegally obtained photograph.

"They had no authority to photograph my office, let alone investigate myself or members of my staff," Nehls wrote on Twitter, explaining that Capitol Police never informed him or his staff of the alleged investigation.

He hypothesized that he may have been "maliciously" investigated because he has "been a vocal critic" of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), the House Jan. 6 committee and Capitol Police leadership "about their handling of January 6th, the death of Ashli Babbitt and the subsequent SHAM investigation."

Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger denied wrongdoing. "No case investigation was ever initiated or conducted into the Representative or his staff," he said.

Manger explained that Nehls' door was left "wide open" the weekend prior to Thanksgiving, and it is normal protocol to "document that and secure the office to ensure nobody can wander in and steal or do anything else nefarious."

He said an officer followed up with a member of Nehls' staff on Monday and "determined no investigation or further action of any kind was needed."

Nehls responded to Manger later that day and called the chief's recollection a "mischaracterization of the events" that "omits key details, and fails to respond to the most troubling actions of his Department." 

Nehls criticized Manger for not mentioning the alleged illegally taken photograph nor "the three agents wearing work clothes that returned to my office without advance notice for further questioning regarding the initial entry."

He welcomed the Office of the Inspector General to investigate the matter. He also asked Capitol Police to release the photo in question.