Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry permits

The high court announced the ruling on Thursday
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Supreme Court exterior
U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.
(Monte/JTN)

The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a New York gun law that puts restrictions on carrying a concealed gun outside the home.  

Justice Clarence Thomas wrote the majority opinion in the 6-3 ruling, with liberal-leaning Justices Kagan, Sotomayor and Breyer dissented. 

"The New York "proper cause" requirement violates the Constitution because it allows only public-carry licenses when an applicant shows a special need for self-defense," Thomas said in the opinion. 

The New York law required concealed carry permit applicants to show proper cause for the permit. Applicants were forced to show a particular reason why they had to defend themselves, rather than just general self defense. 

The suit came from two men who applied for concealed carry permits, but were permitted to carry only for the purposes of hunting and when going to and from work. 

The New York State Rifle Association challenged state law, arguing that the second amendment gives them the right to carry a firearm without needing a special reason.

Reactions poured in immediately following the decision. 

"Shocking. Absolutely shocking that they have taken away our right to have reasonable restrictions," New York Governor Kathy Hochul said in a press conference. 

"Today's Supreme Court decision is a huge victory for the Second Amendment rights of all Americans," Senator Ron Johnson Tweeted.