Former D.C. National Guard official says generals lied to Congress about Jan. 6

Col. Earl Matthews calls military leaders "absolute liars" over their accounts of riot
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Capitol riot
U.S. Capitol Building riot, Washington, D.C. Jan. 6, 2020.
(Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

A former member of the D.C. National Guard has accused two Army leaders of perjuring themselves before Congress in an attempt to rewrite the history of the military's response to the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Col. Earl Matthews, a high-level Pentagon official during the Trump administration, has authored a 36-page report criticizing the Pentagon's inspector general for what he believes is an error-riddled account created in order to protect a top Army official who argued against sending the National Guard to the Capitol, according to Politico.

In the memo, Matthews calls Gen. Charles Flynn and Lt. Gen. Walter Piatt "absolute and unmitigated liars" for their description of the events of Jan. 6. On the day of the riot, Matthews was serving as the top attorney for Maj. Gen. William Walker, then the commanding general of the D.C. National Guard. Walker is now the House sergeant at arms.

The memo argues that Flynn and Piatt's testimonies to Congress were "replete with factual inaccuracies" and that the Army has attempted to create its own revisionist version of the events of the day that are "worthy of the best Stalinist or North Korea propagandist."

The memo comes after a public call from Walker for the inspector general to retract its detailed Jan. 6 report, which he called "inaccurate" and filled with "sloppy work."