'Horrendous': Ga. audit lawyer demands full investigation into Fulton County's ballot irregularities

Attorney warns that county could be "undermining the will of the people."
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Ballot processing at State Farm Arena, Nov. 2
Ballot processing at State Farm Arena, Nov. 2
(Megan Varner/Getty)

A lawyer spearheading a major ballot audit inside Georgia's largest county is warning the irregularities apparent in that county's election management are "horrendous" and cut against "the basic principle of our democracy."

Atlanta-based attorney Bob Cheeley made those claims while talking to Just the News editor-in-chief John Solomon on Tuesday night's "Securing our Elections: Protecting Your Vote" special on Real America's Voice.

Cheeley is among the investigators approved by a Georgia court to audit the 2020 absentee ballots of Fulton County, Ga., a county critical to Joe Biden's historic 2020 win of Georgia that helped propel him to the White House.

Just the News in recent weeks revealed what appear to be major data discrepancies in Fulton's accounting of its absentee ballot numbers. Cheeley told Solomon on Tuesday that he and his team are working to "allow the truth to come out."

Cheeley called attention to what appeared to be instances of double-counting and double-scanning of ballots within Fulton's data, something he said "violates the basic principle of our democracy" and "smacks at the very heart of our democracy by undermining the will of the people."

He also pointed to extensive notes by an election monitor hand-picked by Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger; those notes revealed the inspector's belief that "massive" election issues were playing out in Fulton County before and during the 2020 election, including double counting and serious chain-of-custody and security issues surrounding absentee ballots.

Georgia state officials "did nothing about it," Cheeley said. "So that should have raised a red flag, in my opinion, that they should have more closely scrutinized."

Asked about his degree of confidence in Fulton's election management, Cheeley called the county's performance "horrendous."

"And that's why we need an audit," he said, promising to have "10 certified document examiners lined up" to pore over the tens of thousands of absentee ballots recorded by the county. 

Cheeley stressed several times that Georgia officials should have detected the errors apparent in the county's data, including what are apparently multiple instances of missing batches of absentee ballots. 

"All you have to do is be able to count to see that these batches are missing," he said. "And we want to know where they are."