Data suggests Alzheimer's drug may benefit some patients

The study involved 1,795 participants divided between recipients of Lecanemab and a placebo group, and spanned 18 months.

Updated: November 29, 2022 - 8:39pm

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Clinical trials of a new Alzheimer's drug, lecanemab, dropped Tuesday evening, indicating that it had demonstrated positive results in treating the condition.

"Lecanemab reduced markers of amyloid in early Alzheimer's disease and resulted in moderately less decline on measures of cognition and function than placebo at 18 months but was associated with adverse events," reads a summary of the report published in the New England Journal of Medicine. "Longer trials are warranted to determine the efficacy and safety of lecanemab in early Alzheimer's disease."

Manufacturer Eisai and Biogen announced in September that the trials had shown positive results, prompting a surge in the firm's stock price, according to the New York Times. Roughly six million Americans are afflicted with the condition.

The study involved 1,795 participants divided between recipients of lecanemab and a placebo group, and spanned 18 months.

The Food and Drug Administration is expected to render a decision on granting "accelerated approval" for the drug by Jan. 6, the Times noted. That process allows a drug for a severe illness with few other treatments to secure faster FDA approval with trials ongoing.