Judicial Watch accuses Secret Service of changing its story on Hunter Biden's gun

The watchdog sued in September of this year to secure the documents.

Updated: December 1, 2022 - 9:26pm

The Facts Inside Our Reporter’s Notebook

Judicial Watch on Thursday accused the Secret Service of repeatedly changing its story with regards to its possession of documents related to an incident involving a firearm owned by Hunter Biden.

Judicial Watch noted in its press release that the Secret Service had initially responded to its Freedom of Information Act request in April 2021, indicating they had found relevant documents and would process them through the FOIA request. In October of this year, however, they claimed that email was in error and they possessed no such documents.

The watchdog sued in September of this year to secure the documents.

In November, the agency then informed the District Court that it had found 100 records, totaling over 400 pages, that could be relevant to the FOIA request. The agency said they would be fully processed by Jan. 9, 2023.

"The Secret Service's changing story on records raises additional questions about its role in the Hunter Biden gun incident," Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said. "One thing is clear, Judicial Watch's persistence means the public may get records that the Secret Service suggested didn't exist."

In October 2018, Hallie Biden, Hunter's sister-in-law, disposed of the gun in a dumpster behind a grocery store but later returned to find it had disappeared. An investigation followed due to the dumpster's proximity to a school and fears it could be used in a crime. The firearm was never recovered and the Secret Service reportedly visited the gun shop and took possession of the purchase records.