Israel approves more than $100 million to upgrade 25 miles of security fence after terrorist attacks

The Defense Ministry hopes to start work on the barrier "as soon as possible."
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Israeli soldiers patrol the northern border with Lebanon near the Israeli settlement of Shtula
Israeli soldiers patrol the northern border with Lebanon near the Israeli settlement of Shtula
(Jalaa Marey / Getty Images)

The Israeli Security Cabinet on Sunday approved funding to greatly improve about 25 miles of a security barrier between Israel and the West Bank following a rise in terrorist attacks.

The group unanimously allocated about $110 million to be used to build a 30-foot concrete wall to replace a fence built two decades ago, the Defense Ministry stated on Twitter.

The ministry hopes to start work on the barrier "as soon as possible" to start closing gaps in the barrier, according to a translated statement.

The plan was approved after the terrorist who killed five people in Bnei Brak last month came through a gap in the security barrier, The Times of Israel reported. 

The Palestinian terrorist who killed three Israelis in Tel Aviv last week may have also snuck through the fence as well, authorities state.

"We will fight terrorism with all the tools at our disposal, and we will win," Prime Minister Naftali Bennett tweeted.

The security barrier was originally built in response to the Second Intifada, a wave of suicide bombings and other terrorist attacks against Israel from 2000 to 2005.

The security barrier upgrade comes after 14 Israelis have been killed in four different terrorist attacks over the last few weeks. 

The plan was approved after Palestinian rioters also vandalized Joseph's Tomb over the weekend, a holy site to Christians, Muslims and Jews.