House Republicans pass resolution to support earmarks

Republicans haven't used the "earmark" since they banned their use in 2011.

House Republicans passed a resolution Wednesday to support restoring earmarks.

In a 102-84 vote in the House Republican Conference, GOP lawmakers reversed their previous decision to ban earmarks, according to The Hill.

Directed Congressional Spending, otherwise known as "earmarks," allows lawmakers to put spending requests into large bills, particularly for projects in their home state or district. The effort helps with reelection and, as some argue, gets lawmakers more engaged in the legislative process. 

Republicans voted in 2011 to get rid of earmarks in an attempt to get end such so-called "pork spending," according to CNN.

Members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus oppose reviving earmarks – calling the policy "legislative bribery."

"I think we've got $30 trillion in debt, and people are tired of the swamp. And the GOP should be ashamed of itself if it jumps headfirst right back into the swamp," Texas Republican Rep. Chip Roy said.  

Republicans move to allow the use of earmarks again comes as Democrats are preparing to allow earmarks to be used in upcoming spending and infrastructure legislation.