With Congress poised to get tough about social media content, Zuckerberg, others present their plan 

Facebook's Zuckerberg will be joined by Twitter's Jack Dorsey and Google's Sundar Pichai.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other social media leaders are set to present to Congress on Thursday their proposed revisions to federal regulations requiring them to to identify and remove unlawful content.

Zuckerberg, Twitter's Jack Dorsey and Google's Sundar Pichai will each present their respective proposal to the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Social media platforms have federal protections with regard to liabilities for the third-party content posted on their sites. But they have come under increasing pressure to be more thorough and balanced in such effort – amid the risk of losing such protections. 

"Instead of being granted immunity, platforms should be required to demonstrate that they have systems in place for identifying unlawful content and removing it," Zuckerberg will say in his opening remarks, according to reporting by NBC News.

Zuckerberg argues that social media companies shouldn't receive immunity – as part of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. He thinks Congress should instead require companies to find and remove unlawful content.

"Platforms should be required to demonstrate that they have systems in place for identifying unlawful content and removing it," Zuckerberg will also say in his opening remarks.

Still, Zuckerberg thinks social media companies shouldn't be held liable for said unlawful content, according to Business Insider.

NBC News says that the proposed plan from Zuckerberg could shore up Facebook's social media clout by requiring smaller companies to spend time and money on the proposed systems while larger companies like Google and Facebook will be able to foot the bill.