Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene said the 'swat' on her home could have caused her to be killed by police

The Rome Police Department Criminal Investigation Division is working with U.S. Capitol Police on incident

Updated: August 24, 2022 - 8:50pm

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GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene says her house was "swatted" early Wednesday morning, and it could have cost her her life.

"Just after 1 a.m. I was I was awakened by knocks on my door and hearing people right outside my bedroom windows and saw flashlights," Greene described the situation. "I jumped up, got dressed and picked up my gun to carry with me to the door as I normally do, especially in the middle of the night, when I'm not expecting company. But I had a gut feeling, don't carry your gun."

The practice of swatting is typically calling a police department to the home of somebody whom the caller doesn't like to report a violent crime in progress. It could send officers to the location, prepared to draw their guns, which would increase the likelihood of the person in the house getting harmed.

"Someone called 911 and said that someone had been shot five times in the chest in a bathtub in my house, and that there were children in the home," Greene said on Just the News, Not Noise. "They (the police) were responding to what would normally be if it were real, a very serious situation where more people could have been killed, or perhaps a suicide."

Greene later went on to say that this "swat" could have caused her to be killed by the police. 

"I'm so proud of my local law enforcement," Greene expressed. "They came to my house very quickly. They were prepared tactically to handle such a terrible situation. But then we quickly realized what it was and it was an awful prank on both of us. Not only me, that could have caused me to be killed by the police."

According to the Rome Police Department, at about 1:03 a.m., "officers responded to a 911 call reference to a subject being shot multiple times at an address within the city limits. When officers responded they discovered this was the home of Marjorie Taylor Greene. She assured the officers there was no issue, and the call was determined to be a false call commonly known as 'swatting.'"

The department said it also received a second call – from the suspect – who was using a computer generated voice stating that he/she was upset about Mrs. Greene's political views on transgender youth rights. Rep. Greene has recently introduced a bill that would make "gender affirming care" for minors a felony.

"I'm not going to stop," Greene stated on Just the News, Not Noise. "I am convicted even more so in this legislation and how important it is. Kids need to be protected and their innocence needs to be protected and their bodies need to be protected until they become adults and they can make rational decisions."

Rome police also said its Criminal Investigation Division is working in conjunction with the United States Capitol Police on the matter.

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