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Mike Johnson fundraising email warns God may punish U.S. for 'collective sins'

"Let’s face it- we live in a depraved culture. I didn’t want to believe it at first, but I fear God may allow our nation to enter into a time of judgment for our collective sins," he said.

Published: December 5, 2023 3:38pm

House Speaker Mike Johnson over the weekend sent a fundraising email laden with references to God and cultural issues, expressing fears that the Lord may soon put the United States through a time of trial to punish the nation for its sins.

"I’ve been thinking about the state of our country, and I cannot conclude anything other than America is hanging on by a thread. Our culture has fallen so far since the founding of our country, and it's just getting worse. I fear America may be beyond redemption," he said in the National Republican Congressional Committee email, which Punchbowl News obtained.

"Just consider the frightening drop in church attendance over the past several decades. 1 in 4 high school students identifies as something other than straight- what are they being taught in school?" he went on. "God is mocked openly in the public square. And you don’t even want to see the filth that passes for popular culture these days."

"Let’s face it- we live in a depraved culture. I didn’t want to believe it at first, but I fear God may allow our nation to enter into a time of judgment for our collective sins," he went on. "The only question is, is He going to give us one more chance to restore our foundations and return to Him?"

"I hope so, but we are teetering close to the edge," he warned. "America needs to recognize that we have much to repent for if we want to avoid the judgment we so clearly deserve, but that starts with returning America to God’s good graces once again."

"Does America need more God?" he asked, inviting recipients to respond.

Johnson has made no secret of his Christian faith, even before becoming the leader of the lower chamber. His public commentary on his faith has prompted furious criticism from left-wing pundits. Earlier this month, for instance, talk show host Bill Maher accused him of "religious fanaticism" and "rooting for the end of the world so we can get on with the Rapture." 

The religious messaging is a stark contrast form prior Republican speakers, such as Kevin McCarthy and Paul Ryan, who generally were more reserved about including religious language in party messaging.

Ben Whedon is an editor and reporter for Just the News. Follow him on X, formerly Twitter.

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