Lawmakers introduce legislation to speed military aid, arms to Taiwan

The bill states that meeting the defense needs of Taiwan and other Pacific allies must be made “a national security priority.”

Updated: July 4, 2022 - 11:29pm

The Facts Inside Our Reporter’s Notebook

Two Republican members of Congress have introduced legislation to speed the delivery of U.S. arms sold to Taiwan in the face of growing hostility from China.

The Arms Exports Delivery Solutions Act would mandate that “defense equipment already purchased from the U.S. by Taiwan and other allies in the region are tracked and delivered as efficiently as possible as the Chinese Communist Party eyes further aggression,” according to a statement.

Reps. Young Kim, R-Calif., and Michael McCaul, R-Texas, introduced the bill last week before Congress took its July 4 recess.

“Delayed deliveries of congressionally approved sales to Taiwan are undermining our ability to deter an attack from China,” McCaul said. “This is incredibly concerning as China ramps up its belligerence towards Taiwan.”

China has shown increasing aggressiveness with military patrols and rhetoric as it seeks to unify with Taiwan, drawing rebukes from Washington and Taipei.

The legislation would require the Pentagon to submit a report by March 1 identifying approved but pending U.S. arms sales over $25 million to Taiwan or other allies in the region like Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

The bill states that meeting the defense needs of Taiwan and other Pacific allies must be made “a national security priority.”

Just the News Spotlight