Twitter threatened with class-action suit for censoring doctors who question COVID vaccines

No action by Twitter against medical professor who mocked Florida surgeon general for disclosing childhood molestation — although platform locked out genomics researcher for "abusive" tweet fact-checking COVID vaccine trial.

Updated: August 4, 2022 - 11:16pm

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Twitter and COVID-19 vaccine makers have been peas in a pod for the past 18 months, with the former heavily policing claims about the latter's products even when the source of evidence is the FDA.

But with federal acknowledgments that the vaccines play only a marginal role in mitigating COVID infection and transmission, and emerging evidence that their protections against hospitalization and death were oversold, the corporations are facing potential legal challenge, with repercussions for their bottom lines.

One Ivy League epidemiologist is predicting insurers will go after vaccine makers for misleading them about "all-cause mortality" in clinical trials, while another told Just the News his lawyer will soon threaten to file a class-action suit against Twitter.

Andrew Bostom, a longtime member of the Brown University medical faculty until last year, said he would be the named plaintiff in such a suit. He was suspended by Twitter twice in a month for sharing research on vaccine side effects.

Genomics researcher Kevin McKernan, who has endured repeated lockouts for questioning the evidence behind COVID vaccine claims, told Just the News he's deciding between two attorneys, including former FDA Chief Counsel James Lawrence, who's representing Bostom and previously got journalist Alex Berenson reinstated through litigation.

"Engaging [Twitter] before I'm actually banned will likely lack standing" to sue, McKernan wrote in an email. "Also keeping a close eye on Andrew Bostom." Twitter didn't respond to queries about the legal threats.

Twitter also recently suspended MIT senior research scientist Stephanie Seneff, who studies "the role of nutrition and environmental toxicants on human disease." She's the corresponding author on a new peer-reviewed paper on "innate immune suppression" by mRNA COVID vaccines.

In a July 19 notification Seneff showed Just the News, Twitter said she was being locked out for pointing followers to an essay by doctor Paul Alexander, also suspended by Twitter. The former Trump administration Health and Human Services official urged parents not to give their children COVID vaccines, which "subvert their innate immune system and can kill them."

"I was probably a bit foolish" to share the article, Seneff wrote in an email, but "I am terrified of the future prospects of young children who are being injected with the COVID-19 experimental vaccines," which she believes will "accelerate the rate of increase in autism over time."

While she wrote an unsuccessful rebuttal challenging Twitter's decisions, and called herself "frustrated" with Twitter's "widespread censorship" of information about COVID vaccines, Seneff said she's "not considering any legal steps at this time." 

This week, the company locked out vaccine researcher Jessica Rose for sharing a Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System report on a 13-year-old girl who died less than a month after receiving a Pfizer vaccine dose.

McKernan said the three of them "have all published/attempted to publish" with COVID contrarian cardiologist Peter McCullough, who coauthored Seneff's paper. "Usually faced academic gate keeping at the journal level," McKernan said.

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YouTube removed an interview with mRNA vaccine pioneer-turned-critic Robert Malone, as he predicted it would, less than three days after the Dutch podcast De Nieuwe Wereld posted the interview. An archive shows it had 42,000 views as of early Aug. 1.

Malone was joined by Dutch vaccine developer Theo Schnett, who described his new study, not yet peer-reviewed, that tested "the possibility of correlation of the booster vaccine campaigns (in the 60+ year cohort) in the Netherlands to excess all-cause mortality." According to Malone, who posted the hour-plus interview on his own website, the study used the government's "regional vaccination waves" as a "form of internal controls in the data analysis approach."

YouTube owner Google, recently ordered by a federal judge to turn over internal documents in an antitrust lawsuit by Rumble, didn't respond to queries about the video's removal.

McKernan is on his final "strike" before suspension for telling another user vaccine trials didn't have hospitalization or death as "endpoints," which Twitter first deemed misinformation and then surreptitiously revised as "abusive behavior." He's since taken to highlighting abusive behavior against COVID contrarians left untouched by Twitter.

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"Let's see what @TwitterSupport does with a physician that mocks another minority physician regarding his childhood molestation," McKernan wrote Tuesday, pointing followers to a tweet by University of Alabama Birmingham clinical assistant professor Joy Henningsen.

"Florida's 'Surgeon General,'" the Twitter-verified doctor wrote, using scare quotes, to share an interview with Joseph Ladapo, a skeptic of one-size-fits-all COVID vaccination programs, where he alleged he was molested as a child and recovered from the trauma through "Chinese healing techniques."

Henningsen, who describes herself on LinkedIn as a "Passionate medical news contributor for both national and local news outlets," made her Twitter account private soon after Just the News asked her to clarify the meaning of her quote-tweet, and didn't answer an email query.

Twitter didn't answer how Henningsen's tweet compared to McKernan's under its "abusive" prohibition.

"UAB recognizes individuals' constitutionally protected rights to free speech ... even when speech is counter to the institution's vision, mission and values," university spokesperson Bob Shepard told Just the News when asked if Henningsen's tweet violated any academic or professional code. "Personnel matters are handled between the institution and employees."