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Sen. Joe Manchin calls for bipartisanship and civility in American politics

“Now, more than ever, we must enter a new era of bipartisanship in Washington," the senator said in a statement.

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Sen. Joe Manchin in December 2020
Sen. Joe Manchin in December 2020
(Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)
Updated: January 6, 2021 - 6:12pm

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Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia issued a call on Wednesday for bipartisanship to prevail in American politics.

“Now, more than ever, we must enter a new era of bipartisanship in Washington," the senator said in a statement. "With tight margins in the House and Senate, Democrats and Republicans are faced with a decision to either work together to put the priorities of our nation before partisan politics or double down on the dysfunctional tribalism." 

“With respect to the Senate, we must return to regular order. I am hopeful that we will set an agenda that invites vigorous and respectful debate on the issues that matter. Above all, we must avoid the extreme and polarizing rhetoric that only further divides the American people — I will work tirelessly to make sure we do," the West Virginia Democrat said. “To ensure we achieve this new era of bipartisanship let us all commit to restoring decency and civility to our politics, and becoming the example of governing the American people deserve and the world expects.”

Media projections indicated that Democrat Raphael Warnock won his Georgia Senate contest against GOP Sen. Kelly Loeffler, and then on Wednesday afternoon the other Senate contest was called in favor of Democrat Jon Ossoff who faced off against Republican David Perdue.

If those wins are certified and Joe Biden is inaugurated as president, Democrats will control the Senate: Republicans will have just 50 seats, while Democrats will have 48 Senate seats plus Independent Sens. Bernie Sanders and Angus King who caucus with the Democrats — as Vice President, Kamala Harris would be the tie-breaking vote in the congressional chamber.