'Abortion on Demand' protesters march to Amy Coney Barrett's home with bloody pants and baby dolls

One protester claimed "this is what Amy's America looks like"

Updated: June 19, 2022 - 6:10pm

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Pro-choice protesters marched to Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett's home while carrying baby dolls and wearing pants appearing to be soaked with blood as the high court appears poised to overrule the landmark abortion precedent set in Roe v. Wade.

Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights, a group whose tagline is "Abortion On Demand & Without Apology," has been constantly protesting. On Saturday, the activists marched to Barrett's home in Falls Church, Virginia, as part of a "Youth Procession" that group said was organized by a 15-year-old girl named Arianna. 

"We are here at Justice Amy Coney Barrett's house today with our arms tied, with our mouths covered, holding dolls because this is what Amy's America looks like," Arianna told a reporter. 

"Children will be forced to give birth to children! Women will be silenced! Women will be invalidated!" the teenager yelled.

Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights said protesters were bringing dolls to the justices' home because Justice Barrett asked during oral arguments in December why safe haven laws did not take care of the "consequences of parenting and the obligations of motherhood that flow from pregnancy."

"This is the terrifying visual of what America is going to look like," Arianna added.

Safe haven laws allow unharmed infants to be surrendered to authorities in designated locations such as at police stations, hospitals and fire stations. 

"No need to worry about forced motherhood states Aunt Amy with adoption as the solution (completely absent from her 'solution' is any concern for women and girls being pregnant against their will)," the group claimed on its event page.

In another post online, the abortion organization said it is "COMING to DC to STAY" as Tuesday may be the day the Supreme Court overrules Roe v. Wade with a decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health.