The definition of being 'fully vaccinated' against COVID-19 could change, CDC director says

The CDC estimates about 58% of the U.S. population are fully vaccinated against the virus, while nearly 68% are only partially vaccinated.

Updated: October 22, 2021 - 8:41pm

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The U.S. could change the definition of being fully vaccinated against COVID-19,  the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Friday. 

The definition might be changed as booster shots become more prevalent, the CDC Director Rochelle Walensky told reporters in a briefing. 

"We have not yet changed the definition of 'fully vaccinated.' We will continue to look at this," Walensky said. "We may need to update our definition of 'fully vaccinated' in the future. If you're eligible for a booster, go ahead and get your booster and we will continue to follow up."

According to The Hill, the term "fully vaccinated" applies to people who have received the one-shot Johnson and Johnson vaccine, or both doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

According to the White House, more than 70 million Americans qualify for a booster shot, while predicting another 120 million Americans should become eligible in the coming months. 

Currently, the CDC estimates about 58% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated against the virus, while nearly 68% is only partially vaccinated.