CDC hides removal of COVID vaccine claim: mRNA, spike protein 'do not last long in the body'

Page was changed between July 22 and 23, but the page itself says last update was July 15.

Updated: August 15, 2022 - 4:08pm

The CDC removed language from a page explaining how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work without telling the public the page had been updated, much less what had been changed, according to Just the News' review of archived pages.

One of three headings under the "facts" section was completely removed between July 22 and July 23. It said:

"The mRNA and the spike protein do not last long in the body. Our cells break down mRNA from these vaccines and get rid of it within a few days after vaccination. Scientists estimate that the spike protein, like other proteins our bodies create, may stay in the body up to a few weeks."

As of Monday morning, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention page says it was last updated July 15.

Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) highlighted the removal Saturday night, crediting scientist Ray Armat for the discovery. 

"The CDC is quietly deleting misleading information from their website," Massie wrote on Facebook.

Asked for an explanation, CDC press officer Scott Pauley said the agency "routinely reviews our webpage information to ensure we have consistent and up-to-date recommendations." It "adjusted" that page and removed that portion to make it consistent with all COVID vaccine pages.

"However, this was not a change to the science of how the mRNA vaccines work. The mRNA from these vaccines are broken down by the cells that interpret this coding, and the process takes a few days after vaccination," Pauley said, providing the CDC's boilerplate recommendation of COVID vaccination and boosters for everyone 6 months old and up if eligible. 

He didn't mention the page's claim about the spike protein or answer why the page gives a most recent update of July 15.

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