Ranking GOP member on House Ways & Means Committee says middle class will be affected by IRS audits

Texas congressman says that the new IRS policies and audits are going to have affect on middle class Americans and small business owners

Updated: September 12, 2022 - 8:06pm

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Ranking Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee Kevin Brady says the IRS policies in the Inflation Reduction Act are going to be a burden on middle class families.

The Inflation Reduction Act was a bill signed by President Joe Biden in August and contained provisions for tax and climate initiatives. 

"This so called Inflation Reduction Act, now called the climate bill, is going to raise taxes on middle class families," the Texas congressman said on the Monday edition of "Just the News, Not Noise." "It's going to hire up to 87,000 new IRS agents targeted mainly at what I would call value shoppers."

Brady described value shoppers as middle class families who typically shop at stores such as Walmart, Ross, and Target where "every penny really matters." 

"Those value shoppers those middle class workers, will see an additional 710,000 new audits each year as a result of this bill," Brady continued. "Why in heaven's name is Joe Biden and his White House harassing and picking on the working class families that they've most damaged since they've gone to the White House?"

Executive Director of Taxpayer Protection Alliance Patrick Hedger explained on the Monday edition of "Just the News, Not Noise" how the IRS usually operates.

"The IRS tends to go after low hanging fruit," Hedger explained. "This is what public choice economics tells us. If you got a government job, you're not going to make the the hardest effort to go after some billionaire that's got an army [of] accountants and lawyers able to fight back. You're going to go after that low hanging fruit."

Low hanging fruit refers to poor and middle class families who won't be able to fight the IRS based on unfair audits or policies. 

"You need to have this sort of structural reform," Hedger said. "Because it remains to be seen what kind of strings are going to be attached to this funding and what Congress is going to do in terms of oversight."