Support Just the News

Help Fund Honest Journalism

Donate

Police secure Capitol after deadly siege by pro-Trump protesters, lawmakers resume election debate

Woman shot reportedly has died. Law enforcement say they have secured the Capitol building again by nightfall.

Updated: January 7, 2021 - 12:14am

Protesters on Wednesday breached the U.S. Capitol in a stunning force, forcing congressional members to halt their certification of the 2020 electoral votes and shelter in place. 

The chaos started at about 2 p.m. after a rally outside the White House ended and protesters made their way down Constitution Ave to Capitol.

Law enforcement reportedly secured the building by nightfall. 

The surreal scene included police in tactical gear with automatic rifles and protesters smashing windows to get into the Capitol Building, where they ransacked rooms and took pictures of themselves occupying lawmakers' offices and meeting rooms.

A woman who was shot in the chaos reportedly died Wednesday night. 

Some of the protesters were seen walking through Statuary Hall, just a few feet away from where the Senate, where members were attempting to certify the electoral votes for the 2020 presidential election. Members of the House and Senate reportedly are attempting to resume their joint session before midnight to verify the electoral votes of the 2020 presidential election.

Police in tactical gear from multiple police agencies rushed to the Hill. They were joined by members of the National Guard, which was activated by D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser. The mayor also declared a 6 p.m curfew.

Pepper gas was used to get protesters to retreat, and congressional members were asked to put on gas masks and evacuate. They were ushered to a secure, undisclosed location. There are also reports of U.S. Capitol Police having drawn their guns to keep protesters off the House floor. The Senate chamber has also reportedly been breached.

The first indication of the chaos that would ensue was a bomb scare at the Cannon Office Building, in which House members have their congressional offices. The second bomb threat was made for the Library of Congress Madison Building. Both are on Independence Avenue, within a couple hundreds yards from the Capitol Building.