Dr. Harvey Risch warns COVID vaccines are interfering with the body’s ability to fight current version of virus

Dr. Harvey Risch, a professor emeritus at the Yale Public School of Health, discusses recent data showing that  the COVID-19 vaccine is contributing to causing new infections, as with each additional booster shot, the vaccine becomes less effective and interferres with the bodies natural ability to fight off the mutated virus strain. Commenting, that from what the medical community has observed, that after each shot, "there's a period of about seven to 10 days, when people are at increased risk for adverse events, including getting COVID. After that period, there's a span of somewhere between four and 16 weeks, during which there is in general is benefit from the vaccines in reducing risks of getting COVID and other outcomes like hospitalization and mortality.” Saying that the "window shortens with each successive booste.” but after "that window elapses, then the benefits of the vaccines go toward zero and cross zero and become negative, meaning that they increase the risk of getting COVID after that long period has elapsed, and they also increase the risks of hospitalization mortality after an even longer period has elapsed.” Risch comments, that it “is not completely well understood,” why this is happening but that mRNA vaccines, like the COVID vaccine, "are a sufficient jolt to the immune system but that when that when the virus changes when it mutates, and a new strain that really isn't so well covered by the what the original vaccines,” so "the immune system makes antibodies based on what the vaccine was, not antibodies that work on the new strain, the mutated strain.” Leading to the mutated "virus's ability to escape the new antibodies.” So the vaccines, "after a long period of time, when they're no longer so effective, with the newer strains of the virus, are interfering with the ability of the immune system to take out the virus itself, the immune system itself."