Bolton mulls presidential bid after Trump's Constitution remarks

"I'd like to see Shermanesque statements from all the potential candidates," he said.

Updated: December 5, 2022 - 8:28pm

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Former Trump National Security Adviser John Bolton said this week he would consider a bid for the presidency in 2024 after his former boss made comments suggesting he backed the termination of certain provisions in the Constitution.

Bolton, during an appearance on NBC News' "Meet the Press NOW," called on all of the GOP's potential 2024 nominees to repudiate Trump's remarks and added that he would mull a bid of his own if they failed to do so. No Republican other than Trump has officially announced a 2024 bid.

"I'd like to see Shermanesque statements from all the potential candidates," he said, in reference to Trump's remarks. "If I don't see that, I'm going to seriously consider getting in."

Bolton later posted the remarks to Twitter, doubling down on his potential White House bid.

Last Friday, Twitter owner Elon Musk, via independent journalist Matt Taibbi, released internal documents appearing to show that Democrats had preferential access to the platform's censorship tools.

The former president reacted furiously to the revelations, asserting that the platform's collusion with the Democrats validated his claims of widespread fraud in the 2020 presidential election.

"So, with the revelation of MASSIVE & WIDESPREAD FRAUD & DECEPTION in working closely with Big Tech Companies, the DNC, & the Democrat Party, do you throw the Presidential Election Results of 2020 OUT and declare the RIGHTFUL WINNER, or do you have a NEW ELECTION?" Trump wrote on TRUTH Social. "A Massive Fraud of this type and magnitude allows for the termination of all rules, regulations, and articles, even those found in the Constitution," the post continued. "Our great 'Founders' did not want, and would not condone, False & Fraudulent Elections!"

Trump later asserted that he did not seek to "terminate" the Constitution, but that the extraordinary circumstances called for drastic measures to "right the wrong."

"Simply put, if an election is irrefutably fraudulent, it should go to the rightful winner or, at a minimum, be redone," he said. "Where open and blatant fraud is involved, there should be no time limit for change!"