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Can the Lone Star State go it alone? State lawmaker introduces 'TEXIT' bill for secession

The bill's nickname of TEXIT appears to take inspiration from the British campaign to leave the European Union, or "Brexit."

Published: March 7, 2023 4:06pm

Updated: March 7, 2023 4:44pm

A Texas lawmaker has introduced a so-called "TEXIT" bill that would put secession from the Union on the ballot.

Rep. Bryan Slaton, R-Houston, introduced the Texas Independence Referendum Act which would facilitate a statewide vote on whether Texas "should reassert its status as an independent nation," the New York Post reported.

The Republic of Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836 and formally joined the United States in 1845 in the wake of the Mexican War. The state previously seceded from the Union as part of the Confederate States of America during the U.S. Civil War.

"The Texas Constitution is clear that all political power resides in the people. After decades of continuous abuse of our rights and liberties by the federal government, it is time to let the people of Texas make their voices heard," Slaton said in a tweet announcing the bill's introduction. "On this 187th anniversary of the fall of the Alamo I'm proud to file this bill to let the people of Texas vote on the future of our State. Texas was born out of a desire for liberty and self-governance, and that desire continues to burn in the hearts of all Texans."

The Battle of the Alamo was a famous engagement in 1836 during the Texan Revolution during which Texan forces occupied an old Spanish mission and held out against Mexican forces for several days before being slaughtered nearly to a man.

The bill's nickname of TEXIT appears to take inspiration from the British campaign to leave the European Union, or "Brexit."

Ben Whedon is an editor and reporter for Just the News. Follow him on Twitter.

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