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Democrat-led House votes Thursday on removing GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene from committees

House Republican leadership is standing by the first term congresswoman

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Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene
Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene
(Sarah Silbiger / Getty Images)
Updated: February 4, 2021 - 8:11am

The Democrat-controlled House will vote Thursday on whether to remove freshman GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments, making good on a vow to hold a vote if GOP leadership didn't remove her for past, incendiary comments.

The scheduled vote follows House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy declining Wednesday night to take action against the Georgia congresswoman.

McCarthy called House Democrats' plan to hold a vote "partisan power grab," after the sides failed earlier this week to reach a compromise on what to do about Greene.

Greene serves on the Budget and the House Education and Labor committees. 

McCarthy said his offered to move Greene to the Small Business Committee was rejected.

"Marjorie's also a small business owner. Move her to Small Business. I made that offer to Democrats and they chose to do something that Congress has never done," McCarthy said.

Greene's conduct has divided congressional Republicans, including drawing criticism from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who on Monday night, condemned her embrace of "loony lies and conspiracy theories," without naming Greene specifically.

On Wednesday, during a closed door House GOP conference, Greene apologized to her colleagues and told them she had made mistakes in terms of how she conducted herself on social media.

She also denied any knowledge about "Jewish Space Lasers" and defended some of her earlier comments about school shootings, saying that she had a personal experience with a school shooting. 

Several of her Republican colleagues gave her a standing ovation at the end of her remarks. 

Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, of Florida, is sponsoring the privileged resolution to remove Greene from her assignments.

The measure is expected to pass because it needs only a simple majority.

"I am in the process of talking to Republicans, and although I don't have a lot of hope that I will attract Republican co-sponsors, I do expect that when we bring the resolution to the floor as a privilege resolution that it will attract Republican support, but not much," Schultz said.

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