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Medical group sues FDA over vaccine authorization, says emergency renewals are illegal

"The emergency declaration and its multiple renewals are illegal, since in fact there is no underlying emergency," the suit reads, adding over 60 pages of detailed arguments.

Updated: July 21, 2021 - 2:17pm

The Facts Inside Our Reporter’s Notebook

The medical group America's Frontline Doctors filed a lawsuit this week against the Food and Drug Administration's parent company, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, claiming that all three coronavirus vaccines in use should be barred from continued emergency authorization. 

The group, headed by certified emergency physician and attorney Simone Gold, has been highly scrutinized over the past year, as they've challenged Dr. Fauci and mainstream Covid-19 ideas. 

A public health emergency was filed more than a year ago on Feb. 4, 2020 and remains in effect today due to multiple renewals by the government agency. 

The suit, which targets the DHHS Secretary Xavier Becerra, says with a survivability rate above 99% – comparable to the seasonal flu – there is no public health emergency that justifies overriding the constitutionally protected right to personal autonomy and bodily integrity. 

The plaintiffs move to stop the FDA from continuing its emergency declaration that allows the Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines to be distributed without regular approval on the basis that "a serious or life threatening disease or condition" exists. 

"The emergency declaration and its multiple renewals are illegal, since in fact there is no underlying emergency," the 67-page suit reads.

The suit also calls attention to the widely used and also emergency-authorized polymerase chain reaction or PCR tests. 

"The way in which the PCR tests are administered guaranties an unacceptably high number of false positive results."

It also cites Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to explain the risks and lack of effectiveness associated with the vaccine, which the group says typically takes 10 to 15 years to develop with animal and human trials.