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Federal appeals court blocks portions of New York concealed carry law

Dubbed the Concealed Carry Improvement Act (CCIA), the measure imposed a litany of restrictions on permitholders, including barring the carrying of firearms in an array of sensitive locations and requiring applicants to list their household members on an application.

Published: December 8, 2023 9:28pm

Updated: December 8, 2023 10:35pm

The U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday blocked portions of New York's concealed carry restrictions, which the state passed in response the Supreme Court's striking down a requirement that concealed carry permit applicants demonstrate a need to carry a firearm.

The court issued that ruling in 2022 in the New York State Rifle & Pistol Association, Inc. v. Bruen case, one of the most substantial gun rights developments in recent years. The Empire State swiftly passed extensive restrictions on concealed carry permitholders.

Dubbed the Concealed Carry Improvement Act (CCIA), the measure imposed a litany of restrictions on permitholders, including barring the carrying of firearms in an array of sensitive locations, requiring applicants to list their household members on an application, and that applicants demonstration good moral character. The Friday court decision upheld those provisions, but struck down requirements that applicants provide their social media accounts and a ban on carrying firearms on private property accessible to the public and in houses of worship.

Gun rights groups involved in the case offered mixed responses to the decision, lauding the court for blocking some provisions, while excoriating the appeals court for issuing an opinion they said "reads like a repudiation of Bruen, finding ways to claim its holdings don’t apply here."

Gun Owners of America Senior Vice President Erich Pratt reacted the ruling, saying "Governor Hochul and her cabal in Albany never seem to get the message, and in turn, GOA is proud to have played a major role in rebuking her unconstitutional law. Nevertheless, this was not a total victory, and we will continue the fight until this entire law is sent to the bowels of history where it belongs."

The case is likely to reach the Supreme Court, which in January declined to block the restrictions while the appeals process plays out.

Gun Owners Foundation spokesman Sam Paredes, moreover, stated that "[i]t's encouraging that the Court blocked the intrusive social media provisions, but just as intrusive are the processes needed to confirm someone is 'of good moral character,' which the Court has inexplicably chosen to uphold."

"Frustratingly, much of this Court's opinion reads like an insubordinate rebuke of the Supreme Court, which is a disgrace and cannot be allowed to stand. We are weighing action at the nation's High Court," he added.

Ben Whedon is an editor and reporter for Just the News. Follow him on X, formerly Twitter.