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Georgia voters registered at postal, commercial addresses that appeared to be residential, study

Analysis was led by Matt Braynard, a former data and strategy director for President Trump's 2016 election campaign.

Updated: November 25, 2020 - 11:58am

The Facts Inside Our Reporter’s Notebook

More than a thousand Georgia voters registered and voted using addresses from postal facilities or businesses that appeared to be residential addresses, according to a former Trump campaign official and his team who analyzed voting data from the state.

The analysis was led by Matt Braynard, a former data and strategy director for President Trump's 2016 election campaign, and uncovered, based on just a partial review of state data, over a thousand early and absentee ballots connected to such addresses on voter rolls, the Epoch Times reports.

The addresses listed on the rolls included information that didn't make sense for the locations, but appeared on paper to look like residential ones, the newspaper also reported. 

Some of the locations were UPS and FedEx locations. 

Nearly all those "who disguised a postal facility as their residential address" used an absentee ballot to vote, Braynard said.

Georgia election law states that “the residence of any person shall be held to be in that place in which such person's habitation is fixed, without any present intention of removing therefrom."

It also states that anybody who knowingly gives false information when registering as an elector can be charged with a felony and put in prison for up to 10 years or fined up to $100,000.

The office of Georgia Secretary of State has yet to respond to a request for comment by Epoch Times. Trump trails his opponent, Democrat Joe Biden, by roughly 13,000 votes in Georgia.