Trump again says he'd pardon Jan. 6 rioters, also says he's 'financially supporting' some defendants

Trump has raised possibility of pardons, but idea of apology, financial support new

Updated: September 2, 2022 - 9:58am

The Facts Inside Our Reporter’s Notebook

Former President Trump says he would issue full pardons to Jan. 6 rioters.

"I mean full pardons with an apology to many," Trump on Thursday morning told conservative radio host Wendy Bell, according to The Washington Post.

Federal prosecutors continue to charge people connected to the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol and bring them to trial and sentencing.

On the same day Trump suggested he would pardon at least some of those found guilty in connection to the riot – if reelected president – a jury sentenced former New York City police officer and Marine Corps veteran Thomas Webster to 10 years in prison on multiple charges including assaulting law enforcement officers and violent and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Webster's sentence was the longest so far in connection with the riot. 

On Wednesday, federal prosecutors charged an attorney connected with the far-right militia group Oath Keepers, whom they say helped orchestrated the riot. The attorney, Kellye Sorelle, was charged with conspiracy and obstruction of justice.

In the nearly 20 months since the riot, roughly 370 rioters have pleaded guilty to federal charges or been convicted in connection with the riot, and over 220 have been sentenced. Over 800 defendants have been arrested and federally charged from nearly all 50 states and the District of Columbia, also according to the newspaper

Trump, during the radio interview, also said he met with some Jan. 6 defendants earlier this week and is helping some financially.

"I am financially supporting people that are incredible and they were in my office actually two days ago, so they're very much in my mind," he said. "It's a disgrace what they've done to them. What they've done to these people is disgraceful."

Trump in previous interviews has raised the possibility of pardons, but the idea of an apology and financial support is new.