Army temporarily stops sending new recruits to basic training

Coronavirus mitigation move will remain in place for two weeks 

Image
army
A solider wears protective gear to prevent coronavirus infection
(Terrance Bell U.S. Army Garrison Fort Lee Public Affairs)
Updated: April 6, 2020 - 10:57pm

The Army has temporarily stopped sending new recruits to basic training, the U.S. military service announced Monday. 

The hiatus is an effort to help contain the spread of the coronavirus and is effective immediately. The measure will remain in place for two weeks.

“This tactical pause will allow commands to ensure appropriate safety measures are in place and are operating effectively at training installations,” the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) wrote in a release to Just the News.

The pause will protect the current and future force, the organization’s leader said in a statement.

“One of TRADOC’s main focuses is to develop leaders by accessing, training and educating soldiers,” said Gen. Paul E. Funk, II, who leads the command. “We have to do so responsibly, and we’ve already begun protecting those currently in our ranks with social-distanced-enabled training, reduced movement of our soldiers and trainees, and increased screening of those moving across our commands.”

Soldiers now in the training pipeline will finish their schools and upon graduation proceed to their next assignment, the Army said. 

Under new guidelines, the graduates will be medically screened before shipping out, then travel aboard sterilized buses while maintaining spaced-apart intervals. 

“The decision to pause the shipment of trainees to BCT [Basic Combat Training] for two weeks will allow leaders to focus on setting conditions so movement can be conducted in a safer manner in the future,” Funk said.

Last week, the Army announced that some recruits whose induction has been delayed will be paid as if they are on active duty. The head of Army Recruiting Command has explained the move as a humanitarian response to challenging times.

“It’s important that we take care of our people,” said Maj. Gen. Frank Muth. “This virus has been a challenge for all of us, and we want to be sure our future soldiers are not put into a difficult situation because we had to reschedule their ship dates.”

Muth also said: “We are doing everything we can to protect our personnel and those who are in the process of joining our team.”

 

Just the News Spotlight